MORBID ANGEL Unleash Unsettling Nader Sadek-Produced “Garden Of Disdain” Video

 

 

Legendary death metal unit MORBID ANGEL today unveils the unsettling new video for “Garden Of Disdain” from the band’s recently-issued Kingdoms Disdained full-length.

 

Produced by Nadar Sadek, “Garden Of Disdain” is a tale of allegory and Sumerian-fueled vision. Bristling with gore and metaphor, Sadek has created a disturbing piece that depicts the darkest, most hopeless sides of the human condition.

 

“My intention is to create a visual parallel to the song,” offers Sadek, “a theme which repeats, yet within the loop-lay textures are controlled twists and turns. It was a bonus that I had the opportunity to use Sumerian iconography as well as obscure symbols of the pre-ancient past such as the Merkaba, a galaxy-roaming vessel. “

 

“Nader does some of the most interesting and dark visual art I have ever seen,” says bassist/vocalist Steve Tucker. “We were excited to work with him and see our musical ideas put into such amazing visuals!”

 

 

Kingdoms Disdained was released in December via Silver Lining Music. The critically-lauded recordreunites founding guitarist Trey Azagthoth with bassist/vocalist Steve Tucker. Captured at Mana Studios in St. Petersburg, Florida and produced by MORBID ANGEL with Erik Rutan, the record delivers eleven pieces of devastatingly dynamic death metal. Rolling Stone hailed a, “cyclone of blastbeat-driven fury punctuated with Azagthoth’s signature heaving, lunging grooves and Eddie Van Halen-on-a-bad-trip solos,” while Metal Injection crowned the record, “one of the band’s most essential efforts,” adding, “the record contains almost wall to wall instant classics, and is not only Steve Tucker’s best album as MORBID ANGEL frontman, but by extension the group’s most genre-defining effort since 1995’s iconic Domination.” Orders for Kingdoms Disdained are currently available at THIS LOCATION.

In conjunction with the band’s US tour, currently underway, Silver Lining Music released a special two-disc digi pack edition of Kingdoms Disdained featuring seven instrumental demo tracks previously only available as part of the deluxe box set. To order the double-disc, go to THIS LOCATION.

 

 
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DISPLAY OF DECAY: “Decimate” Playthrough Premiere

 

 

Display Of Decay have released their latest single and official guitar/bass playthrough, “Decimate”. The track is taken from the bands highly anticipated studio album, ‘Art in Mutilation’, and can be viewed on the Gore House Productions YouTube channel, here:

 

 

Display of Decay state collectively:
“This track was one of the more tricky ones to both write as well as perform, but is easily one of the most punishing tracks. Decimate is a nod to the old school style of death metal Display of Decay was founded on, and is a true statement of what the band has to offer. A big thanks to our sponsors at EMG Pickups and Spector Bass for all of their support!”

Further more, fans can listen to ‘Display Of Decay’ and ‘Unable to Identify’ 

 

 

Gore House Productions confirms May 18th for Display of Decays highly anticipated “Art in Mutilation”.

Celebrating 10 years since their inception, Display of Decay shows no signs of deceleration. ‘Art in Mutilation’ marks the bands latest chapter and their 5thstudio offering. Widely noted for bringing a unique blend of old school death metal, the Edmonton based quartet delivers 8 new tracks of premium, punishing death metal for fans of Cannibal Corpse, Monstrosity, Malevolent Creation, and more. ‘Art of Mutilation’ showcases the crews most vicious material to date
 

Track List:

1. Unable to Identify
2. Forced Frontal Lobotomy
3. Living Monolith
4. Art in Mutilation
5. Condemned to Ash (ft Christian Donaldson)
6. Mortuary of Decay
7. Decimate
8. Human Harvest

Order:
https://www.gorehouseproductions.com/display-of-decay

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/DisplayofDecayOfficial/

https://www.instagram.com/displayofdecay

https://www.youtube.com/user/DisplayofDecay

https://twitter.com/displayofdecay

https://soundcloud.com/displayofdecay

 

 

 

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INHUMAN REMNANTS Release Single ‘II’ From ‘SOLIPSIS’ EP Released June 1st

 

 

Spawning from deep within the aphotic caverns that lurk below the nation’s capital of Canberra comes Inhuman Remnants. They are today announcing the release of their new track – II. Solipsis! Premiered at Youtube Channel Slam Worldwide to their audience of nearly 100k subscribers, the brutal, dark Death Metal track shows off the razor sharp edges, devastating vocals and precision playing of the band.

The track is part two of a three-part story that makes up the mini-EP ‘Solipsis’ that will see its full release on June 1 through Eschatonic Records. The single will see its release this Friday in iTunes, Bandcamp and Spotify.

The dark, brooding track was Mixed/Mastered at TsunTsun Productions and the lyric video created by Drain Hope. 

 

Inhuman Remnants are a mainstay of the Death Metal scene in Australia – The end of 2012 saw them release their first EP ‘Anathema’ along with the start of many live shows along the east coast of Australia. Gaining momentum, the band began amassing an eager online following and 16 months later, they released their sophomore EP ‘Inattentional Blindness’ in early 2014.

 

Since 2014 Inhuman Remnants has fine tuned their live show by supporting bands such as AbortedCattle DecapitationRevocationKing ParrotNe ObliviscarisBorn of OsirisThe Black Dahlia Murder and many more.

Inhuman Remnants’ EP ‘Solipsis’ will be unleashed upon an already plagued world on Friday June 1 in iTunes, Spotify and Bandcamp. 

For more information, go to http://www.inhumanremnants.com

 

 

Website: http://www.inhumanremnants.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/inhumanremnants

Twitter: http://twitter.com/inhumanremnants

Bigcartel: http://inhumanremnants.bigcartel.com

Bandcamp: http://inhumanremnants.bandcamp.com

Merchr: https://www.merchr.net/collections/inhuman-remnants

 

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Senzar: Potent New Extreme Metal Band Emerges From Dublin

 

 

From the ashes of Dublin veterans Coldwar, Senzar have emerged, even more enraged and potent as before delving far into philosophies and marrying it with the raw energy of extreme metal.

 

Vocalist Trevor McLave explains that, “Inspiration behind the name derives out of numerous relating sources. The argument put forward in Ernst Cassirer’s essay on man, where he argues man is a symbolic animal being one. Senzar, as the mystery of the mystery language, whether this be mythological or not, is in my opinion, in itself a measurelessly potent idea for a name. With regards to Coldwar. That was a project with which the line-up varied over the years. It was consistently transforming. The later Coldwar was by all rights something other than what it had started as. Due to dynamics and politics from within the band it transpired the time was right to allow what was manifesting to become something within its own right. Which is exactly what it now is.”

 

The band will release their untitled debut record, an EP on 20th July 2018 via Hostile Media, and today have released the first taste of what’s the come.

 

 

McLave adds, “Not to be pedantic but, it’s not a self-titled release, it’s non-titled. We wanted to take our musical ideas a lot further than we were able to with Coldwar, elements of which were hinted at on Pantheist. Creating atmosphere and soundscapes which hold measureless potency, correlating with the lyrics and retaining raw energy and heaviness was our goal. Regarding the lyrics, I guess there are rudiments of consideration regarding mankind’s position in the greater scheme of the cosmos. Beyond that, it really is something purposely devised as being unfixed, thus open to beholders interpretation.”

 

Characteristically esoteric, Senzar are inspired by the relation of the human condition to the complexity and mystery of the cosmos. Motivated by the obscure yet intelligible patterns of order from chaos and our natural creative impulse, and being influenced by the darker, more challenging cultural output of modernity, they articulate a metaphysical engagement between the self and the natural world.

 

“The music is an endeavour to explore the unity and multiplicity of Being,” states vocalist Trevor McLave. “Both interpretive and descriptive, it explores beyond the scope of the rational gaze to disclose the world, which, understood as a totality of all things, we are embedded in, and fundamentally related to in ways which are mystical.”

 

Pre-Order The Senzar EP Here: www.facebook.com/hostilemedia/shop

 

www.facebook.com/senzarband
www.facebook.com/hostilemedia
www.hostilemedia.net

 

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Burning The Dream Release New Single/Video ‘Who Are We To Judge’

 

 

Burning The Dream are a progressive metal band from Glasgow, Scotland on the more extreme end of the progressive scale with flashes of death, thrash, metalcore and nu metal influences.

They released their new video/single ‘Who Are We To Judge’ yesterday and released this statement. 

“So here it is!!! “Who Are We To Judge”. The first single off our upcoming EP “Dark Waters”. Huge thanks to Tristan Dales​ at Tristan Dales Videography for filming, editing and directing the video.

Let us know what you all think and go pre-order the EP athttps://burningthedream.bandcamp.com/releases” 

Judging from this track, their EP should be very good. They are highly rated within the Scottish scene so I’ll be keeping an eye on this band going forward. A great track and formal introduction for me to this band! 

 

Get the EP from https://burningthedream.bandcamp.com/…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/burningthedream

 

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1995: The Year That Broke The Original Sepultura

1995: The Year That Broke The Original Sepultura

 

In 1995, Sepultura made the album that should’ve cemented their legacy. A year later, their career was in tatters. Max, Iggor, Andreas and Paulo discuss a story which has raged on for decades

 

Sepultura were the greatest success story of the mid-90s. Four kids from the cultural backwater of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, they journeyed from sub-underground death metal no-hopers into global ambassadors for their home country, and for metal as a whole.

The band’s still-explosive 1989 album Beneath The Remains served notice of their impending genius, but it was their fifth full-length record, 1993’s Chaos AD, that found Sepultura jumping several gears, pushing them far beyond their contemporaries. Its groundbreaking mix of jagged noise and South American influences sounded like nothing that came before it, while frontman Max Cavalera raged against corruption and stupidity with the conviction of a man who had nothing left to lose.

The album connected instantly, smashing into the UK Top 20 and the US Top 40 like a Molotov cocktail. Successful tours with the likes of Pantera and Ministry followed.

“During the making of Chaos AD, we were very focused, very organised, very connected,” says guitarist Andreas Kisser today. “We were together, it was a very special moment in Sepultura’s career.”

But there were downsides. The pressures of success, and the responsibilities of being flagbearers for a new generation of metal bands soon began to have an effect on the ‘classic Seps’ line-up of Max, Andreas, bassist Paulo ‘Jr’ Pinto and drummer, Max’s brother Iggor Cavalera.

“All of a sudden we’re this really big machine and we couldn’t really comprehend it,” says Max now. “We didn’t know how to deal with it.”

In October 1995, Sepultura entered Indigo Ranch Studio in Malibu to record the follow-up to Chaos AD with rising nu metal producer Ross Robinson. The album built on the indigenous Brazilian influences of its predecessor, simultaneously taking them further away from their death metal past towards an incendiary, groove-driven battery.

Max: “There was no pressure on the music side. We’d proved that we could take this thing in any direction we wanted, and it was great.”

Iggor: “It was very early where Max came up with the Roots song, and from then on we were building, thinking about what would be the ‘roots’ of our music. We did a lot of crazy experimenting.”

Andreas: “Ross Robinson had a whole new perspective. He came and showed a lot of new possibilities for us. He really brought that idea of the ‘Brazilianness’: the jams, the free approach to everything.”

Iggor: “He was pushing a lot of crazy ideas. I remember coming back from the studio with a tape we’d done there, and I didn’t know what we were going to do with it, ’cos there was so much going on – a thousand guitars on a take with noises and percussion, that kind of thing. I was a bit confused.”

Max: “The greatest thing was having the combination of Ross and [engineer] Andy Wallace. Ross recorded it on his own and it sounded like total dogshit – not for human consumption. We’d send it to Andy. It would be like sending him a diamond covered in shit, and he had to clean all the shit from it to make the diamond shine, which is what he did.”

Paulo: “When Andy came into the mix, he knew how to make that really noisy, grungy mass sound good.”

Andreas: “It came out very positive. I think that was a merit of the band – to funnel the stuff that was going on in our lives into our music.”

 

 

Released in early 1996, Roots built on the success of its predecessor on both sides of the Atlantic. But imperceptible fault lines were opening up within the band. On one side was Max and his wife, the band’s manager Gloria. On the other were Andreas, Paulo and Iggor.

Andreas: “Things had started to go kind of weird before that. When [Max and Gloria’s son] Zyon was born, instead of putting a band on the cover of a magazine, they had Max with his kid. That’s nothing to do with the band. To have a kid is not that special. I have three myself. I love them, but I don’t use them as a trophy.”

Paulo: “I guess things weren’t right when we started to tour Roots. We saw things were not being represented the way the three of us would like. The other party was taking credit for everything and not really giving the rest of the band the credit for what we worked for.”

Andreas: “Concepts of what Sepultura should be were changing. Max was already being detached from the unity that we had. It was a lead singer with his support band type of vibe. And Gloria was doing a horrible job – she was not trying to keep anything together.”

Iggor: “There was a lot of stupid stuff. Just a lot of drama over nothing. You get to the point where you travel so much, little things can be super- dramatic. It’s like Spinal Tap – people would freak out over not having the sandwich we wanted.”

Max: “We started seeing all these shady guys in the dressing room, managers meeting with the other three guys, trying to steal the band from Gloria’s management.”

Andreas: “Sepultura only works if we are a band, if we can talk to each other and respect each other. We were at a point where we were just going onstage to play, and that’s how they wanted to keep going.”

n August 1996, Sepultura arrived in the UK to play the Monsters Of Rock festival at Castle Donington, opening for Kiss and Ozzy. They were greeted by the tragic news that Gloria’s son, Dana Wells, had been killed in a car accident at home in Phoenix.

Andreas: “We just arrived in England to play Castle Donington, and we got the news. I was the one to bring the news to Gloria. I took her away from her room and told her.”

Max: “The minute we arrived, there was a knock on the door and it was Andreas – he had this pale, ghostly expression that I’d never seen before, and I knew that something was incredibly wrong. He told Gloria, ‘Your son died.’ From that moment on, the whole day just spiralled out of control. Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne really helped us a lot, they’re the ones that helped us get back home. Without them, we couldn’t have got home so quick.”

Andreas: “We had a big show, in our heads probably one of the biggest shows in Sepultura’s career, and we decided to go ahead and do the show as a trio. I’m glad we did. There were mixed emotions. A profound sadness for a huge loss, but at the same time playing at Castle Donington. It was very weird. I don’t think I’ll ever experience anything like that again.”

Max: “I spent the night before the funeral with Jason Newsted, making a cassette tape with Dana’s favourite songs. We put a cassette player on his coffin and we let it play until the batteries ran out. During the funeral there was a jam session between Andreas and Jason, playing acoustic guitar – they made that for Dana. It was beautiful, really touching.”

Andreas: “But from that point, the whole emotional instability just got bigger. Especially from Gloria’s family.”

 

 

 

Rather than bring the two warring factions together, Dana’s death only drove them further apart. The tensions that had been simmering came to the boil post-Donington. Andreas, Paulo and Iggor decided that they no longer wanted Gloria to manage Sepultura.

Andreas: “We had the contract. We had a legal tool on our side, where we could exercise an option not to continue with Gloria because we wanted to change the way Sepultura’s business was done. And they didn’t want to hear it.”

Max: “The other three guys, they just stopped talking to Gloria completely, which was really cold. Who does that? I had my own brother doing that, which was really hard to understand.”

Paulo: “We tried to talk to Max but it was hard.”

Max: “You don’t just change people for no reason. If it wasn’t working, I could see the point of changing: ‘Yeah, let’s change, we gotta do something.’ But that wasn’t the case at all. We were more successful than ever. It was incomprehensible.”

Andreas: “We had a big fight with Gloria in Buenos Aires [on November 14, 1996]. That’s where Sepultura ended. But we decided to go to Europe to do the tour, to try and make Sepultura possible for another year. It was crazy.”

Sepultura’s European tour began in Belgium on November 20, 1996, and ended just under a month later at London’s Brixton Academy on December 16 – the day their contract with Gloria Cavalera ended. Immediately after that final show, all the issues that had been brewing finally came to a head. Interestingly, the former bandmates have very different views on how the show itself went.

Max: “The show was fantastic, super-energetic, high energy – we were playing really good.”

Andreas: “I know it was great and everything, but it could have been much better if we were a band.”

Paulo: “It was a very shitty show.”

Iggor: “At the end of the show, it was, like, ‘It cannot continue like this.’ That’s when we took the decision we did.”

Andreas: “We terminated our deal with our manager there, and [Max and Gloria] decided to leave Sepultura.

Max: “I don’t think it was in the dressing room. It was more on the bus ride going to the airport. I probably had a little bit to drink, so I was on the edge. I told them, ‘If that was how it was going to be, fuck you all, I’m out of here.’”

Iggor: “I don’t know if anyone tried to talk Max out of leaving. It was a lot of turbulent times.”

Andreas: “Of course we tried to talk Max out of leaving.”

Max: “Gloria tried to talk me out of it. She told me go with them. I couldn’t. I just couldn’t. I’m not that kind of person. I cannot fuck people over like that. That’s how great of a person she is – just go with them, stay with them. I’m, like, ‘I’m not doing that to you. It’s absurd.’ They had a meeting to try to get me back.”

Andreas: “It’s really hard when you do a meeting with Max and Iggor. You can spend two hours talking, some explanation of stuff, and somehow they leave there and nothing happens. It’s really weird way of doing business.”

 

 

As the shock news of the split between Max and his former bandmates broke, both parties retreated to take stock. Inevitably, the shattered relationship turned poisonous, with barbs thrown in the press. Privately, both parties were facing an uncertain future.

Max: “I could have gone, ‘Fuck you all, this is my band.’ I could have if I’d wanted to. It was my band, invented by me, the name and everything. I just felt it was easier to walk away. But it was six months of hell. I lived in my room, just drinking and taking drugs all day long. I didn’t want anything to do with music.”

Andreas: “We were abandoned. We lost everything that took 10 years to build. We had to cancel shows in Australia and Japan – it was really bad. Bad blood with promoters and everything. All the budgets and big money went to Soulfly. Ross Robinson and Andy Wallace went to Max. We had to rebuild everything.”

Paulo: “Nobody gave us the credit we deserved. We had to start from scratch.”

Max: “I didn’t know what they were going to do, honestly. But Andreas is a very ambitious guy. I knew he was probably going to find someone and give it a go. I thought they might even get somebody like Robb Flynn. I was, like, ‘If that happens, I’m fucked.’”

Andreas: “We wanted to change the name, start something totally different. But slowly we put our heads in place and balanced all the options and talked to a lot of people. We were nine months working to find a new manager, a new singer, a new producer – to find a new way to keep Sepultura going.”

Max: “The hardest part was Iggor, because he was my brother. I was, like, ‘How could you do that to me?’ I don’t know, man. It had a bit to do with greed, it had a bit to do with human nature.”

Iggor: ‘It was horrible. Me and Max being so close together for so many years, doing our little thing, it was very hard. But anybody who has brothers knows how it is a completely different thing than dealing with a friend. With a brother, it doesn’t resolve just by talking. It needs something extreme to happen so you both understand what was going on.”

In the race to release an album, Max’s new project, Soulfly, were first out of the gate. Their self-titled debut emerged in April 1998, produced by Ross Robinson and featuring members of Fear Factory, Deftones, Limp Bizkit and Dub War. The reconstituted Sepultura, now fronted by American singer Derrick Greene, followed six months later with Against. Both albums were accompanied by potshots directed at the other camp in the press – a pattern that would be repeated over the next few years. But further upheaval struck Sepultura in 2006 when Iggor jumped ship to reunite with his brother.

Iggor: “The decision to leave Sepultura wasn’t hard. It was harder to continue without my brother. We’d just had a son, and my wife was really sad: ‘Your brother has never seen our son, that’s not right.’ And I was, like, ‘She’s right.’ So I reached out and talked to him. That was the first step.”

Max: “He came back and apologised. He told Gloria he was wrong, which is great. To admit that he was wrong on that whole thing, it was really cool of him to do that.”

Iggor: “I flew to Phoenix to hang out with Max. We were influenced a lot by the whole thing with Pantera, the Dimebag thing – like, ‘Look, these guys cannot do what we’re doing right now.’ We know how life, it’s super-short. So I was, like, ‘Fuck it, I just want to hang out with my brother.’”

 

As both sides warily circled each other with teeth bared, there seemed little chance of a reunion of the classic Sepultura line-up, despite huge offers dangled in front of them by promoters. Then, in late 2010, rumours circulated that the band were planning to reunite. Sepultura released a video statement refuting the rumours.

Max: “I was trying for it. I thought it’d be very cool. Especially after I saw Faith No More get back together. It’s like, ‘Why can’t we do the same?’ I actually talked to Andreas on the phone about it, like, ‘Come on man, let’s do this. Let’s fucking do it. The whole world wants it. It would be a great thing.’ And he agreed with me, then a couple of weeks later it was all back to shit again. So I was, like, ‘Fuck it, I’m not going to try any more.’”

Andreas: “There’s been many reunion conversations, especially with Gloria. It’s always them approaching us.”

Iggor: “I think there was some talk. But I never sit down with those guys to discuss anything, so I don’t know how serious those things were.”

Andreas: “We both played at a festival in Germany [in 2009], Sepultura and Soulfly, for the first time. Our bus was parked here and their bus was parked a few metres away. I went out there, Gloria was there. I give her a hug: ‘Hey, what’s up, how’s it going?’ And since then, she was like, ‘OK, maybe we could put all this bad stuff back and we could try again.’ It didn’t go further, because it’s something that’s completely out of reality. It’s not a part of what we are. That Sepultura they have in mind, it’s not us.”

Max: “It was Gloria’s idea for me and Iggor to tour the Roots album (2017’s Roots Reunited tour). I think a lot of fans just wanted to hear the original voice and original drumming. They didn’t care that Paolo and Andreas weren’t in the picture, which was proven by the success of the tour. It sold out everywhere. It was a great tour.”

Andreas: “It’s sad to be dragging up the past. That’s why we don’t spend our time doing tribute tours and shit. We’re very much focused on what we’re doing now, today. We put our energy and efforts into creating a new Sepultura every day.”

n 2018, the gulf between Sepultura and the Cavalera brothers is as wide as ever. Both camps continue to release albums to varying degrees of acclaim, though with only a fraction of the commercial success they enjoyed with Chaos AD and Roots. When it comes to what could’ve been, all members remain philosophical on the subject.

Iggor: “I have no idea how things would be if we’d gotten through the problems.”

Max: “I think we would have been extremely big if we had stayed together. Not as popular as Metallica, but popular. But then Soulfly came about, so it was a blessing in disguise. I last spoke to Andreas six years ago, and I’ve not spoken to Paolo once. Never.”

Andreas: “Do I miss being in a band with Max? No. Not at all. I don’t know him today. I don’t know the person he is.”

Max: “There were some good times, it wasn’t all bad. We actually had a lot of fun. The friendships were cool, you know? I miss that sense of, ‘We can do it, we can conquer the world.’”

Andreas: “There’s no regret at all. I don’t see why we should be regretful when we are in a better place now.”

Max: “Maybe we should have took a year off and come back better than ever. Maybe we would have found a solution for the whole Gloria thing, the whole management thing. At that time, we were not thinking about that. Hot heads prevailed. Would I have done anything differently? I don’t know. I think it was meant to be.”

 

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